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The Lord General's LETTER TO To the Honorable William Lenthal Eſq; Speaker of the Honorable Houſe of COMMONS, Wherein is fully related, The Particulars of the Fight at MAIDSTONE, Where were near Three hundred ſlain, about One thouſand three hundred Priſoners, Five hundred Horſe, Three thouſand Arms, Nine Foot Colours, and Eight pieces of Ordnance, with great ſtore of Ammunition, taken by the Lord Generals Forces.

With a Relation of certain PAPERS taken from the Enemy, of the depth of their Plot and Engagements.

ORdered by the Commons aſſembled in Parliament, That this Letter be forthwith Printed and Pub­liſhed.

H: Elſynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com.

London, Printed for Edward Huſband, Printer to the Honorable Houſe of Commons. June 6. 1648.

3

TO The Honorable William Lenthal Eſq; Speaker of the Honorable Houſe of COMMONS.

Mr. Speaker,

I Shall according to my laſt give you this further Accompt of our ſucceſs at Maid­ſtone: Upon Thurſday in the evening a­bout Seven of the clock, after very long marches, we got near the Town, and a Troop of Dragoons was ſent to make good a Paſs, whileſt the Town was viewing at what place our men might beſt enter, it be­ing reſolved upon to force our paſſage, in caſe of reſiſtance, the gaining of that Town over the River being of great advantage to our Affairs; but before there could be a view taken of the Town, the Dragoons had en­gaged the Enemy; and forc'd them from that ground which they kept; the Dragoons being very forward to engage, purſued, and ſo the Enemy drew forth a conſiderable par­ty4 of Horſe and Foot to maintain a Paſs a­gainſt us, which neceſsitated the drawing down of the greateſt part of the Foot, with ſome horſe: and though that part of the town was of the greateſt difficulty to enter, yet through the goodneſs of God our men made their entrance, and became Maſters of the Town, after four or five hours hot Service; the Town being very ſtrongly Barricoed, and through the darkneſs of the night, and our ignorance of the Town, they diſputed the Barricadoes and places of advantage with our men, playing hard with their Ca­non upon them: In which Service, both Horſe and Foot did exceeding well; and par­ticularly I cannot but take notice of the va­lor and reſolution of Col: Hewſon, whoſe Regiment had the hardeſt task, Major Carter his Major being hurt, and Captain Price, a deſerving and faithful Officer, ſlain: The beſt of their men were there, whereof ma­ny were Cavaliers and London Apprentices; they look'd upon the conſequence of that place to be very great, and therefore did re­ſolve to make what reſiſtance they could,5 the old Lord Goring being that day Proclaim­ed General at the head of their Army upon the Hill near Aylsford, where we ſaw their Body drawn up, which as their Priſoners ſince do confeſs, and they themſelves gave out, conſiſted of Eight thouſand men, be­ſides thoſe in Maidſtone and Aylsford; in both which places there were about Three thou­ſand men, thoſe of Aylsford coming as a freſh ſupply to relieve thoſe engaged in Maidſtone: There were near Three hundred ſlain, and a­bout One thouſand three hundred Priſoners, many of them being taken next morning early in the Woods, Hopyards and Fields whether they fled in the time of the fight; a­mongſt which were Gentlemen of good qua­lity, Sir Gamaliel Dudley, Sir William Brockman, Squire Scot, and Major Price, and others, a Liſt whereof is preparing to be ſent. There were about Five hundred Horſe, Three thouſand Arms, Nine Foot Colours, and Eight pieces of Canon, with ſtore of Am­munition alſo taken. In the firſt Charge which our Forlorn-hope gave the Enemies Horſe (wherein our Horſe carried them­ſelves6 very gallantly, as I ſince hear) Sir Iohn Many, and divers others of quality were ſlain. After it pleaſed the Lord to give us this great mercy in gaining of the Town, their men received ſo great diſcouragement, that the greateſt part of their Army left them, and were diſperſed, and a great num­ber of Officers and Gentlemen ſince fled to ſhift for themſelves: Their word at the Ingagement was, King and Kent; ours, Truth. Having thus poſſeſſed our ſelves of the paſſes at Maidſtone and Aylesford, the Enemy being much confuſed with our Succeſs, and their own men deſerting them, they at laſt marched over Rocheſter bridge towards Black-Heath with about Three thouſand Horſe and Foot, moſt of which were Cava­liers, Apprentices and Watermen, our men being not able to make ſo ſpeedy a march af­ter them as was neceſſary. I ſent Col: Wha­ley with a party of Horſe and Dragoons af­ter them, upon whoſe approach they have left Kent, and are fled over the water into Eſſex by Woolwich and Greenwich: Colo­nel Whaley is in purſuit, and I doubt not7 but he will give a good Account of that Service.

I have ſent Colonel Rich with a party of Horſe and Foot to relieve Dover, where I truſt we ſhall finde the ſame preſence of God as hitherto hath been: My prayer to the Lord is, That this great mercy may be further improved to his glory, and this Kingdoms good. I thought fit to preſent unto the Houſe theſe Papers incloſed, taken from the Enemy, whereby you will perceive the depth of their Plot, and their Ingage­ments to purſue what they have underta­ken, and granting Commiſsions to raiſe Regiments, and the Oath of Secreſie, which they took for the better management of their Affairs: I have ſecured the Major of Rocheſter, whoſe hand is to the Commiſsi­ons granted for raiſing of Forces. I remain

Your humble Servant, T. Fairfax.

I deſire you to be pleaſed to move the Houſe on the behalf of the Widow and Children of Captain8 Price, that ſome proviſion may be made for them, and the Arrears of her Husband paid unto them, for their preſent ſubſiſtence; that thoſe who adven­ture their lives for the Service of the Publique, may receive encouragement for their faithfulneſs to the Publique.

FINIS.

About this transcription

TextThe Lord General's letter to to [sic] the Honorable William Lenthal Esq; Speaker of the Honorable House of Commons, wherein is fully related, the particulars of the fight at Maidstone, where were near three hundred slain, about one thousand three hundred prisoners, five hundred horse, three thousand arms, nine foot colours, and eight pieces of ordnance, with great store of ammunition, taken by the Lord Generals forces. With a relation of certain papers taken from the enemy, of the depth of their plot and engagements. Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament, that this letter be forthwith printed and published. H: Elsynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com.
AuthorFairfax, Thomas Fairfax, Baron, 1612-1671..
Extent Approx. 7 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1648
SeriesEarly English books online text creation partnership.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A84833)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 161775)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 70:E446[8])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationThe Lord General's letter to to [sic] the Honorable William Lenthal Esq; Speaker of the Honorable House of Commons, wherein is fully related, the particulars of the fight at Maidstone, where were near three hundred slain, about one thousand three hundred prisoners, five hundred horse, three thousand arms, nine foot colours, and eight pieces of ordnance, with great store of ammunition, taken by the Lord Generals forces. With a relation of certain papers taken from the enemy, of the depth of their plot and engagements. Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament, that this letter be forthwith printed and published. H: Elsynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com. Fairfax, Thomas Fairfax, Baron, 1612-1671., Lenthall, William, 1591-1662., England and Wales. Parliament. House of Commons.. 8 p. Printed for Edward Husband, Printer to the Honorable House of Commons,London :June 6. 1648.. (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Campaigns -- Kent -- Early works to 1800.
  • Maidstone (England) -- History -- 17th century -- Early works to 1800.

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  • STC Wing F198
  • STC Thomason E446_8
  • STC ESTC R204421
  • EEBO-CITATION 99863915
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