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A true Relation of a great VICTORY OBTAINED (Through Gods Providence) BY The Parliaments Forces in Cheſhire, under the command of Sir William Brereton, AGAINST The Kings Forces under the Com­mand of Sir William Vaughan, neer Den­bigh, November 1. 1645. Where were taken of the Enemy, about Four hun­dred priſoners, Five or ſix hundred horſe, and above One hundred ſlain. Sent in two Letters to the Honorable William Lenthall Eſq Speaker of the Honorable Houſe of Commons.

ORdered by the Commons aſſembled in Parliament, That this Relation be forthwith printed and publiſhed.

H. Elſynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com.

London, Printed for Edward Husband, Printer to the Honorable Houſe of Commons, and are to be ſold at his ſhop, at the ſign of the Golden-Dragon neer the Middle-Temple, Novemb. 5. 1645.

2

To the Honorable VVilliam Lenthall Eſq Speaker of the Honorable Houſe of Commons.

Honorable Sir,

IT pleaſed God this day to be­ſtow upon us a memorable Victory neer Denbigh; ſuch is the throng of buſineſſe lying on us at this time, that we cannot ſignifie the particulars under our own hands, but commit the account thereof to Mr. Lan­caſter, Chaplain to the Cheſhire Forces, who was an Eye-witneſſe in this Service; whoſe relation you may credit as under the hands of

Your moſt humble and faithfull Servants,
  • Tho: Mytton,
  • Mic. Jones,
  • James Louthian,
  • Geo: Gouldegay.
3

To the Honorable William Lenthall Eſq Speaker of the Honorable Houſe of Commons.

Honorable Sir,

IT pleaſed the moſt high, who commands all the Armies in heaven and earth, to magnifie his power this day by a me­morable Victory over the Enemy neer Denbigh, of which (being appointed thereunto by the Commanders, whoſe many other imployments tranſmit it to this pen) I ſhall render as full an accompt as may be expected from a work yet in­digeſted.

Sir William Brereton upon his return to Cheſhire, found the work for reducing Cheſter and Beſton caſtle in a good po­ſture; but the Enemy eſteeming Cheſter the Maſterpiece of the Kingdom, exten­ded their utmoſt endeavours for the relief thereof, gathered into a body about Den­bigh,4 waiting an opportunity for the effe­cting of that high Deſign, without which they gave up thoſe parts as utterly loſt; ſir William reſerving a competent ſtrength to make good both Leaguers, ſent away Col: Jones and Adjutant Louthiane, dex­trous and truſty men, with the Cheſhire Forces and Auxiliaries of the counties of Lancaſter, Derby, VVarwick, Mount­gomery and Salop; the whole about four­teen hundred horſe, and one thouſand foot, being the cream of all theſe parts of the Kingdom. The Enemy, under the command of Sir William Vaughan (as our beſt Intelligence by the priſoners gives us) were about ſeventeen hundred horſe, and four hundred foot: on Thurſday night we marcht to Moulde, on Friday to Ruthin, where having Intelligence the Enemy was at Denbigh (reported to be a far greater number) wee haſted thither5 upon Saturday, Novem. 1. accompanied with that active Gentleman, Gen: Mytton and part of his Auxiliaries, the reſt being left at Cheſter. The Forlorn-hope, forty out of every Regiment was commanded by Capt. Otter captain of the Reformades a gallant Souldier, & Capt. Will: Edwards a Cheſhire captain, and well-deſerving Gentleman, who coming to VVhitchurch a mile from Denbigh, were in a lane flanckt by the Enemies horſe and Dra­goons, ſo that they were forced to make good that paſſe with the Forlorn-hope and Cheſhire Dragoons, under the com­mand of capt. Finch and capt. Holt, ſtout and reſolute men, theſe, with the Forlorn-hope, behaved themſelves gallantly, and maintained the paſſe till the foot came up, the moſt part of which, with the VVar­wick and Derbyſhire horſe, commanded by Major Sanders & Major Hokeſworth,6 ſeconding the Forlorn-hope, bare the burthen of the day, whiles the Refor­mades, Cheſhire horſe, and four hundred Lancaſhire foot vvere intended for a greater ſervice; for, the Commanders finding that ſtrait lane too difficult a paſſe to fall through upon the Enemy, who were marſhalled in open field; theſe laſt mentioned (by the advice of ſome who know the country) were drawn thence by Denbigh-green, a way neer four miles in compaſſe, to fall on the Enemy upon even ground, which whiles drawn off, the foot (exceeding forward to ingage them­ſelves for the whole) beat the Enemy out of the lane, and routed both horſe & foot, driving them under the command of the caſtle, where they rallyed themſelves, but the forlorn-hope, Derby and VVarwick horſe, with the foot, encountred them a­gain, and utterly routed, whom the horſe7 chaſed eight miles in the way to Con­way, making great execution on them in the way, taking many priſoners, and five or ſix hundred horſe, and ſo long pur­ſued, that not above ſeven ſcore were left together.

To give every one his due, in this ſer­vice, would ſavour too much of vain­glory: But this I may modeſtly report, That every one endeavoured to exceed each other in Gallantry, whoſe ſpirits God had raiſed to ſo high a pitch, as might ſuit to a work of ſo high a nature. Its conjectured by thoſe who are beſt able to give account herein, that above one hundred of the Enemy were ſlain, about four hundred taken priſoners, with divers men of quality. Its not known that any of ours are ſlain, and few wounded.

It is the deſire of our hearts, that God alone may have the honour of his own8 work, the characters of whoſe power are ſo memorably ſtampt upon it, whoſe goodneſſe our ſins have not yet ſo wea­ried, to make him weary of renewed mercies. VVhiles we ſet before us, that which our eyes have ſeen, the Enemies compact body, falling off at pleaſure, un­der the protection of the caſtle, our di­ſtracted body the leſſer part ingaged with them, the greater at too great a diſtance for our own relief, theirs flying, our ſmall part purſuing, overtaking, ſpoiling, and now ſafe return'd, after ſo great travell & hazard, wee cannot but proclaim to the world, that the Heavens rule; to the Church, that this God is our God for ever & he ſhalbe our guide unto death. By the next there will be given an exact account of the priſoners, & moſt memorable paſ­ſages, which now cannot be preſented by

Sir,
Your Honours moſt humble Servant, Nathanael Lancaſter.

About this transcription

TextA true relation of a great victory obtained (through Gods providence) by the Parliaments forces in Cheshire, under the command of Sir William Brereton, against the Kings forces under the command of Sir William Vaughan, neer Denbigh, November 1. 1645. Where were taken of the enemy, about four hundred prisoners, five or six hundred horse, and above one hundred slain. Sent in two letters to the Honorable William Lenthall Esq; Speaker to the Honorable House of Commons. Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament, that this relation be forthwith printed and published. H. Elsynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com.
AuthorLancaster, Nathaniel, 1600 or 1601-1661., ; England and Wales. Parliament. House of Commons..
Extent Approx. 8 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1645
SeriesEarly English books online.
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(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A88571)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 113290)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 50:E308[14])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA true relation of a great victory obtained (through Gods providence) by the Parliaments forces in Cheshire, under the command of Sir William Brereton, against the Kings forces under the command of Sir William Vaughan, neer Denbigh, November 1. 1645. Where were taken of the enemy, about four hundred prisoners, five or six hundred horse, and above one hundred slain. Sent in two letters to the Honorable William Lenthall Esq; Speaker to the Honorable House of Commons. Ordered by the Commons assembled in Parliament, that this relation be forthwith printed and published. H. Elsynge, Cler. Parl. D. Com. Lancaster, Nathaniel, 1600 or 1601-1661., England and Wales. Parliament. House of Commons.. 8 p. Printed for Edward Husband, printer to the Honorable House of Commons, and are to be sold at his shop, at the sign of the Golden-Dragon neer the Middle-Temple,London, :Novemb. 5. 1645.. (The second letter is dated and signed: Denbigh town, Nov. 1. 1645. Nathaniel Lancaster.) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Denbigh (Wales) -- History -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Campaigns -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-04 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing L312
  • STC Thomason E308_14
  • STC ESTC R200371
  • EEBO-CITATION 99861162
  • PROQUEST 99861162
  • VID 113290
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