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The Engliſh and Scot­tiſh Proteſtants happy Tryumph o­ver the Rebels in JRELAND.

Declaring the proſperity of the Proteſtant Par­ty, and the diſaſtrous Proceedings of the adverſe Iriſh Rebellion.

Jn the beſiege of Wick­low. The Earle of Kildare And the Lord Thomond. Slew

  • Sergeant Majorromlus.
  • Captaine Thoſby.
  • Captaine Lothon.

The Lord Plunket wounded in the left Legg.

Jn the Siege of Colerane.

  • The Earle of Baremore
  • The Lord Brabeſton,
  • And E. of Eaſtmeath.

Slew The Lord Freeman and 1300 more Rebels. The L. Scane being taken priſoner

In the beſiege of Kingſaile,

  • The Earle of Fingale
  • The Lord Donbengen.
  • The Lord Aſtry.

were overthrowne, By

  • the Earle of Ormond.
  • The Lord Pore
  • Earle of Valentia.
  • Earle of Kildare.

Being ſent in a Letter from Robert Maſon in Wicklow, to VVilliam Francis in London, and brought over by the laſt Poſt on Wedneſday laſt, being the 1. of Iune, 1642.

Together with an Order from both Houſes of Parliament concerning my Lord Howard, and Ordered to be Printed.

Iohn Browne, Cler. Parl.

London, Printed for J. Horton, 1642. June 4.

The Engliſh and Scottiſh Tri­umph over the Rebels in Ireland, being ſent in a Letter from Rob. Maſon of Wicklow, to William Fran­cis in London.

Sir,

I confeſſe I have beene ſilent theſe many Weeks, in not writing unto you the conditi­onall eſtate of this Kingdome, but the reaſon of my ſilence was this, that J was once intended to have ſeene you rather in preſence there in England then to write to you in abſence, for the Rebels had beſieged us tenne daies, which might beget in us a ſufficient ſuſpition of4 danger, but we defended our ſelves very ſtrongly all that time, there being a conti­nuall vigiliae appointed, And we ſent in the meane time private intelligence to the Earle of Kildare, who had pitched his Tets neere Archloo, and to the Lord oThomond, neare Garm••ton who immediately prepared their Forces and aſſiſted us; there was at the firſt skirmiſh ſome efuſion of blood on both ſides, and the Lord Pluneket on the Rebels ſide had his left Legg beaten off, and Cap­taine Thoſby, Captain Lothon and Sergeant Major Bromlus were all ſlain on their part, whereupon the Souldiers began to recant but being cloſely followed they fled, and being purſued by the Earle of Kildare and the Lord Thomond, there were at leaſt ſe­ven hundred ſlaine, the other eſcaped by ſlight.

Thus we were delivered from the rave­nous intents of thoſe bloody Cannibals the next day, there was a publicke thankſ­giving to Almighty God for our delive­rance.

5There were many other terrible Com­bats between the Engliſh and the Iriſh, but of late the Proteſtants have been very Victo­rious. J will deſcribe the relation of two famous Battails betweene them, that are moſt memmorable.

Colerane was taken by the Rebels, five Weeks ſince, and they held it in poſſeſſion three Weeks and upwards, moſt inhuman­ly killing the Proteſtants, ſtriping many naked both men and women, and turned them into the fields, whipping them cruel­ly, but the Earle of Barramore and Lord Brabſton, Earle of Eſt-meath. united their Forces and came with Fifteene hundred men againſt the Rebels in Colerane, but the firſt day there was ſlaine above a thouſand Rebels, and the Lord Brabeſton perceiving them almoſt tired, followed them very cloſe, and at the firſt meeting ſlew the Lord Freeman and tooke the Lord Scane priſner, then the other fled and left the towne, which is now in the poſſeſſion of the Pro­teſtants.

6The laſt Fight betweene the Proteſtants and Rebels was at Kingſaile, the Earle Fin­gale. the Lord Dunbowin, and the Lord Aſ­try, came with foure thouſand againſt it and had almoſt (as I might ſay) taken Kingſaile, but they did not poſſeſſe it long for the Earle of Ormond, the Lord Poore Earle of Valentia, and the Earle of Kildare, came with three thouſand five hundred men, and regained what the other had ta­ken beating them with great violence from the Towne and ſlew the Lord Dunbowin, Cap­taine Humphry, and Sir Patricke Cockſquire, beſides eighteene hundred more, that were ſlaine by the Proteſtant party.

Sr. you ſee how God fighteth for his chil­dren, and I hope by his divine providence and all conquering power, we ſhall over­come them all ſuddenly, but they have done, unknowne miſchiefe to our Country, and men that formerly lived in famous re­putation, and of great abillity are extream­ly impoveriſhed by them the have taken maney Townes, and the Proteſtants alſo7 have taken many townes from them, but the Citty of Galway is beſieged with nigh 1700. men, and in danger to be taken, but withall we heare that the Earle of Ormond, and the Earle of Barramore, are in prepara­tion to come againſt them.

We have theſe ſtrong Pillars of the Pro­teſtant Army.

The Lord OrmondEarle of Eaſt-meath,
The Lord Poore,Earle of Barramore,
Earle of Valentia,Earle of Kildare,
The Lord Brabeſton,The Lord Thomond,

theſe are thoſe that have ſtrongly and couragiouſly reſiſted the Rebels, otherwiſe Jreland had beene ſubdued long agoe, but theſe have magnanimouſly oppoſed them, the Lord Antrim is ſlaine by the Rebels, who was a Nevvtrall. the Lord Macqueere is taken priſner, and the lord Scane alſo by the Proteſtants, many other remarkeable paſsages I could relate unto you, but part­ly time and convenience doe not give me leave, and partly I beleeve you have heard of them already, but I hope J ſhall have8 greater opportunity to ſend you ſhortly ve­ry ioyfull and delectable Newes for I ſee that God doth greately proſper the procee­dings of the Proteſtants, and confoundeth the ſtrength of his and our Enemies, for which wee praiſe and Magnifie his holy and omnipotent Name, and doe heartely beſeech him in our ſupplications, that he would grant us Peace in this World, and eternall happineſſe in the World to come.

Your Friend in all things to his power, Robert Maſon.

JT is Ordered by the Lords and Com­mons aſsembled in this preſent Parlia­ment, that the Lord Howard of Carr ſhall attend his Maieſty and preſent ſome reaſons to him.

Iohn Browne Cler. Parl.
FINIS.

About this transcription

TextThe English and Scottish Protestants happy tryumph over the rebels in Jreland. Declaring the prosperity of the Protestant party, and the disastrous proceedings of the adverse Irish rebellion. Jn [sic] the besiege of Wicklow. The Earle of Kildare and the Lord Thomond. Slew Sergeant Major Bromlus. Captaine Thosby. Captaine Lothon. The Lord Plunket wounded in the left legg. Jn the siege of Colerane. The Earle of Baremore the Lord Brabeston, and E. of Eastmeath. Slew the Lord Freeman and 1300 more rebels. The L. Scane being taken prisoner In the besiege of Kingsaile, the Earle of Fingale the Lord Donbengen. The Lord Astry. were overthrowne, By the Earle of Ormond. The Lord Pore Earle of Valentia. Earle of Kildare. Being sent in a letter from Robert Mason in Wicklow, to VVilliam Francis in London, and brought over by the last post on Wednesday last, being the 1. of Iune, 1642. Together with an order from both Houses of Parliament concerning my Lord Howard, and ordered to be printed. Iohn Browne, Cler. Parl.
AuthorMason, Robert, 17th cent..
Extent Approx. 8 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A89644)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 156731)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 26:E149[24])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationThe English and Scottish Protestants happy tryumph over the rebels in Jreland. Declaring the prosperity of the Protestant party, and the disastrous proceedings of the adverse Irish rebellion. Jn [sic] the besiege of Wicklow. The Earle of Kildare and the Lord Thomond. Slew Sergeant Major Bromlus. Captaine Thosby. Captaine Lothon. The Lord Plunket wounded in the left legg. Jn the siege of Colerane. The Earle of Baremore the Lord Brabeston, and E. of Eastmeath. Slew the Lord Freeman and 1300 more rebels. The L. Scane being taken prisoner In the besiege of Kingsaile, the Earle of Fingale the Lord Donbengen. The Lord Astry. were overthrowne, By the Earle of Ormond. The Lord Pore Earle of Valentia. Earle of Kildare. Being sent in a letter from Robert Mason in Wicklow, to VVilliam Francis in London, and brought over by the last post on Wednesday last, being the 1. of Iune, 1642. Together with an order from both Houses of Parliament concerning my Lord Howard, and ordered to be printed. Iohn Browne, Cler. Parl. Mason, Robert, 17th cent., England and Wales. Parliament.. 8 p. Printed for J. Horton,London :1642. June 4.. (List of casualities included on t.p.) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Ireland -- History -- Rebellion of 1641 -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing M940
  • STC Thomason E149_24
  • STC ESTC R4239
  • EEBO-CITATION 99872629
  • PROQUEST 99872629
  • VID 156731
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