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A DIALOGUE BETWIXT Sir George Booth, AND Sir John Presbyter, At their meeting near CHESTER, UPON The Rendezvouſing of the Army: Wherein, moſt of the Machintions depending upon that Affair, are diſcovered.

Sept: 19 LONDON, Printed for William Wild, 1659.

3

A Dialogue, between Sir George Booth, and Sir John Presbyter, at their Meeting near Cheſter, &c.

Preſ.

WEll met Sir George Booth, You have a fair Army here.

Booth.

O Sir John Presbyter, my good Friend, I am very glad to ſee you here; and as for Our Army, we give you many thanks: it ought more properly to be called Your Army, then ours; for we know, that by your meanes it's raiſed.

Preſ.

Indeed we have done our utmoſt, both by preaching, pray­ing, at our ſeveral meetings (eſpecially in our private Conventi­ons) to carry on this deſign.

Booth.

Sir, We are very ſenſible of your great care and pains there­in: I know my Maſter the King, will not let you go unrewarded.

Preſ.

O Sir! That he were upon the Throne of his Father David, that was lately murdered by the wicked Sectaries! And if we ſhall let them ſtill go on, they will deſtroy us, as they have done him: that's a true Maxim, No King, no Biſhop; No Presbyter, no Parſon; No Vicar, no Curate.

Booth.

Indeed, we are much troubled at theſe times; for we fear that the Sectaries will ruine us all, you ſee they have deprived us of our good Prayer-Book, our Divine-Service; yea, our very Sacraments, as in all our publique meetings.

Preſ.

Oh! We little thought once, to have ſeen ſuch a day of black­neſs upon this Nation; for we thought, that when once the Biſhops had been down, we ſhould have come in their places: otherwiſe we ſhould not, either have preached, or prayed them down.

Booth.

I hope you and your Brethren, have ſeen your error, in be­ing4 inſtrumental, for the pulling down the Fathers of the Church of England; and that in this day, you ſhew your repentance, in that you do your beſt endeavour to bring in, Statu quo, things as they were be­fore.

Preſ.

We have done what we can, to the hazard of our lives, and ſtill ſhall do to the uttermoſt of our power.

Booth.

But put the caſe, we put by this Army & that it ſhould be the Kings pleaſure, to put you in the ſtead of the Holy Fathers of the Church: pray what ſhould be your firſt work, you would do for us, who indeed are your elder Brethren?

Preſ.

The firſt thing we would do, if ever we have power in our hands, it ſhall be to rout out all the Sectaries in England.

Booth.

There be ſo many ſorts of them, that we cannot tell how to name them, or to know them. Pray give me a note of them, that ſo in my march, I may ſecure them.

Preſ.

I, with all my heart. In the general, they are thoſe which cry down Magiſtracy and Miniſtry: ſuch as will not keep their Pariſh-Churches, but run into holes and corners.

Booth.

Is there no honeſt men, that go ſometimes into private meetings? for I remember, my Father hath had many Miniſters and others, at his Houſe, which were looked upon for very honeſt men, by all the Cou trey.

Preſ.

I Sir, then the beſt men were perſecuted: Thoſe were Or­thodox, and they had alwayes a Miniſter with them; but theſe de­ſpiſe them which are Miniſters, and they take upon them to preach themſelves, and cry down Miniſters and Tythes; yea, the very Church of England, the Pariſhes and Clergy; and ſay, that all theſe are Anti-chriſtian.

Booth.

I thank you good Sir John, for this diſtinction; but I pray you, How ſhall I know the ſeveral ſorts of theſe Sectaries?

Preſ.

They are ſo many, that I cannot promiſe to name them all; but will do my beſt, I having but a bad memory, and itsade worſe, by theſe dreadful times: The firſt ſon, are Independents. 2. Anabaptiſts. 3. Quakers. 4. Browniſts. 5. Separatiſts. 6. Neutrall Presbyterians. 7. Seekers. 8. Ranters. 9. Anti-ſcripturiſts. 10. Non-Ordinance men &c.

Booth.

I thank you good Brother, for this kindneſs, pray be pleaſed to give me a note of thoſe, that as they fall into my hands, I may take care to have them diſpatched out of the way.

Preſ.

I, with all my heart; for it would be good newes for Eng­land, if there were not one of theſe left.

5Booth.

Indeed I will acquaint the King with your good ſervice, both to him and the Common-wealth; and I doubt not, but you will have your deſires.

Preſ.

O Sir George, I hear, that the Sectaries Army is marching a­gainſt you, I wiſh that you may be able to oppoſe them: doth your Ar­my increaſe daily?

Booth.

O no, they decreaſe every day, by reaſon of ſome headdy perſons, who contrary to our agreement, have proclaimed our good King before the time which makes my heart to ake; for you ſee, the people are ſet againſt Monarchy; for we ſhould not have proclaimed him, till we had been ſure to have carried the day.

Preſ.

If they were any of the Church-men that did this and I could find them out; it ſhould go hard, but I would get them excommuni­cated.

Booth.

I know not who they were, but I fear, they will undo us by their headdineſs. O, juſt now I hear, that our Enemies are at hand, ready to fight us, and that they are very much ſtronger than we: Good Sir John ſhift for your ſelf, and ſay over your prayers for us.

Preſ.

Good Sir George, be couragious, your cauſe is good, and fight like men, that have the Clergy on your ſide: how then, can you miſ­carry; you ſhall have all our prayers for you; and we will bleſſe you, and curſe your enemies with Bell Book and Candle.

Booth.

O farewell, my dear Brother, and be ſure to keep out of your Enemies hands.

Preſ.

O I wiſh you good ſucceſs, good Brother Booth, and ſhift you for your ſelf: I will do well enough, I have 20 wayes to eſcape your Enemies, &c.

Booth.

Gentlemen, ſtand to your Arms, and hear me a few words. Gentlemen and Fellow Souldiers, This day you hear,hat your Ene­mies draw near, and they are of a far greater number then we, and you know, that when they had a good cauſe, they were alwayes victorious beyond the Seas; but now they have not onely a bd cauſe, but Sir John Presbyter and the Clergy is againſt them: therefore now get your ſelves a name of Renown, that you may be called the redeemers of your Countrey, the Aſſertors of your Brethrens freedom, freeing them from tyranny, ſlavery and thraldom. Now play the men, or ne­ver; now play the men and ever: with your Countrey, reap the bene­fit of this dayes action, that thoſe Enemies whom you now ſee, you may ſee no more, that your good King for whom you fight, may e­ternize you for his beſt Subjects, and rank you among this choyſeſt6 friends; I can ſay no more the Enemy is at hand, Cock your Muſ­quets, Order your Pikes, ſtand your Gound, give Fire; O Gentle­men! ſhift for your ſelves every Man, We have loſt the Day, All is gone, We are undone by reaſon of the Treachery of our Bre­thren.

At Sir George Booth's, and Sir John Presbyter's meeting at the Tower, London.
Preſ.

O My dear Brother Booth, I am very ſorry to ſee you in your Enemies hands.

Booth.

I may thank you for it, for you know, I had never underta­ken this Warr but for you; You told me, the Cauſe was good, and you would ſay your prayers for me: but now I know by woful Expe­rience your Prayers are worth nothing, and your Curſing of our Ene­mies as much: I wiſh, you are not of the ſeed of Baalam, that the more you Curſe a People, the more they are Bleſt.

Preſ.

O patience, good Brother Booth! whatever you do, have a reverend eſteem of the Clergy, or you will turn Sectary.

Booth.

Patience! I have need of patience, indeed: for all my Eſtate will be Sequeſtred, my Wife and Children undone, and I ſhall loſe my Life.

Preſ.

Indeed, I am very ſorry, but the fault is your own, and not mine, as you are pleaſed to ſay; For I did never intend that you ſhould have followed our direction, further then your own ſafety; you were too heady, and you did want diſcretion; otherwiſe you might have been at Liberty, as well as I.

Booth.

Is this all the Comfort I am like to have from you in my Diſtreſſe? Pray what ſhould I have done more then I have? wherein am I heady, and wherein have I forfeited my diſcretion, unleſſe it were in following you, and dancing after your pipe?

Preſ.

I tell you again, that policy is better then ſtrength; and doing things in the nick of time, would have freed you from this trouble you are now fallen into; you are much too blame.

Booth.

What ſhould I have done more then I did, I am ſure I bor­rowed 100000 l. to carry on this buſineſſe, and I rode far and near7 to make Confederates: and I left no means unattempted for the carry­ing on this deſign: And now muſt I be blamed by you?

Preſ.

Come, I will tell you what you ſhould have done: and 'pray, obſerve it well.

When you had received certain Intelligence of the ſtrength of your Enemies, you ſhould have preſently looked after ſelf-preſervation; you ſhould immediately with two or three of your Servants have gone and met the Lord Lambert with this Congratulation, or the like:

My Lord, I am very glad that you are come into my Country, for I ſaw that the People were ſo Malignant, that I thought it was my beſt way to Head them, that ſo I might keep them from their pur­poſe, and in ſo doing, I could not do better Service for my Country, the Parliament, and your Lordſhip; for I feared that ſome deſperate Ca­valier would have Headed them, and then it might have proved a new War; and not onely ſo, but have done much hurt to the moſt Con­ſcientious and Religious People of this Nation. And now I ſhall do my beſt to deliver this Army into your hands; alſo give you the Names of the firſt fomen ers of this wicked Rebellion, &c.

Booth.

But in ſo doing, I ſhould have ſpoken againſt Conſcience, and been looked upon as a Traytor, which would have been worſe than any thing that ever befell me in my Life.

Preſ.

I can but wonder at you: What a piece of buſineſſe that is? Its as ordinary for us Clergy-men to ſpeak againſt Conſcience, as to drink. And as for your being accounted a Traytor, Which had it been beſt? To have been accounted a Traytor, and enjoyed your Eſtate, Family and Life, than to be accounted ſo now, and loſe all?

Booth.

But, What did you do to get off ſo well, and have your Li­berty, ſeeing you were as deep as I?

Preſ.

As ſoon as I heard that the Army was ſo great, and ſo quick­ly Marched into the Country, I and my Brethren faced about, and ſeemed to be for them, and when they were paſt us, we gave out that, if we had known of their coming, we would have attended upon his Lordſhip and the Army; and not onely ſo, but we put it into the weekly Intelligence, ſhewing our good affection to their party: ſo that we are not ſo much as queſtioned.

Booth.

But, Is not this Diſſimulation and Equivocation? How ſhall I know what to believe when I hear you Preach?

Preſ.

If you would know what I mean when I preach, you muſt look upon my actions, and not my words, unleſs it be in theſe parti­culars, &c.

81. When we preach for our Tythes and maintenance. 2. When we cry down the Sectaries. 3. When we would change a ſmall Living for a greater. 4. When we cry up our ſelves for the Miniſters of Chriſt. 5. When we would have power in our hands, to bring all perſons to out form: And laſtly, that we ought to be looked upon for the chief men in the Pariſh, where we dwell.

Booth.

Would I had known you better before I had truſted you; for I thought, whatever you had ſaid, had been an Oracle.

Preſ.

Sir, I mu••tell you, that we are as good as many of the In­dependents: yea, they which are the grandeſt of them in the higheſt eſteem. Witnes Dr. Goodwin, Mr. Lockier, Mr. Nye, and others: did not the firſt of theſe teach, that a Man might as lawfully forſake his Wiſe as his Church; and yet a while after forſook it to be Maſter of Magdalen Colledge in Oxford. And for the ſecond, he could not come from Iſlngton to London, to his Church: neither by Coach, nor by Horſe, he was ſo weak; and yet could preſently ride to Scotland, be­ing ſent for by the Generall: And for M. Nye, he, all men know, is made up of policy, and Mr. Jenkins. What did theſe men do, when they were tryars; but ſay that with their mouth, that they are ut­terly againſt in their hears: namely, in ſending out Laymen to preach, unfit for that work, onely to pleaſe the late Protector. And did not Mr. Caſe, and Mr. Jenkins, in the Tower with Mr. Love, perſwade him, that he ſhould not ſubmit to the Parliament; and ſhortly after his death, ſubmitted themſelves: the which, if he had done, he had ſaved his life; for their caſe was the ſame.

Booth.

Sir John, Give me leave to tell you your own; for though I believe there are ſome honeſt men among you yet I muſt tell you, that you are a pack of very knaves hypocrites, and baſe diſſemblers: Could any man have thought that you would have diſſembled, and cheated your beſt friends? I am aſhamed that ever I owned you, I did expect better things from you: you cry out againſt the Sectaries, can they poſſibly be as bad as you many of them I know to be of ho eſt lives and Converſations, deal­ing faithfully with their friends, and will die before they will betray their own Brethren: get you out of my ſight, I abhorre to think of ſuch perfi­dious impudent Cheats as you: Let me ſee you no more, Amen.

FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA dialogue betwixt Sir George Booth, and Sir John Presbyter, at their first meeting near Chester, upon the rendezvousing of the Army: wherein, most of the machinations depending upon that affair, are discovered.
AuthorDelamer, George Booth, Baron, 1622-1684..
Extent Approx. 17 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1659
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A81433)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 168695)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 148:E995[22])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA dialogue betwixt Sir George Booth, and Sir John Presbyter, at their first meeting near Chester, upon the rendezvousing of the Army: wherein, most of the machinations depending upon that affair, are discovered. Delamer, George Booth, Baron, 1622-1684., Presbyter, John, Sir.. 8 p. printed for William Wild,London :1659.. (Annotation on Thomason copy: "Sept: 19.".) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Delamer, George Booth, -- Baron, 1622-1684 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Presbyter, John, -- Sir -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing D1354
  • STC Thomason E995_22
  • STC ESTC R207809
  • EEBO-CITATION 99866837
  • PROQUEST 99866837
  • VID 168695
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