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A DECLARATION OF THE Prince Paltſgrave, TO THE High Court of PARLIAMENT, concerning the Cauſe of his departure out of England in theſe times of diſtractions, and the manner of his cariage and behaviour during the time of his continuance with His Majeſty in the North.

Likewiſe his earneſt requeſt to the Parliament, and the Parliaments anſwer thereunto: Declared in his Letter to the Houſe of Peeres on Tueſday laſt.

ALSO THE QUEEN OF BOHEMIA her Reſolution concerning Prince ROBERTS coming into England againſt the Parliament.

Likewiſe a true Relation, ſhewing how the Marqueſſe of Hartford and his Company are beſet by the Earle of Bedford and his Forces.

Printed for J. Greene. October 1. 1642.

1

THE QUEEN OF BOHEMIA Her Reſolution concerning Prince Roberts coming into England againſt the Parliament.ALSO THE PRINCE PALTSGRAVES Declaration to the Parliament of his departure out of England in theſe times of diſtraction: with his earneſt requeſt to the Parliament, and the Parliaments anſwer thereunto.

THe Prince Paltſgrave hearing of the jealouſies and differences that began to ariſe betweene the King and Parliament, came into England, no doubt with an intent to uſe his beſt skill to ſettle thoſe diſtractions: but it ſeemed his coming was not very well pleaſing to his Majeſtie; for after his coming to London, for ſome ſpace of time, he was not admitted into his Majeſties pre­ſence,2 but lay privately at Eſſex houſe, and therefore was there the leſſe hopes that his coming ſhould doe any good: which when he perceived, he tooke his leave of his Majeſty, and went again o­ver into Holland, his ſecond brother Prince Robert going away alſo with him. But it ſeems thoſe two brothers had contrary affections and intents to­wards England: for the one went with an intent and purpoſe to ſtay in Holland and not to meddle further with the di­ſtractions that were in England, and the other (as it appeares by the event) with a reſolution to bring in what Forces he could to aſsiſt the King in a war againſt the Parliament. But ſome are of opi­nion, that it was infuſed into his braine by the Queene after he went over from hence, which was much againſt his Mo­thers (the good Lady ELIZABETH) mind. And although ſhe could not per­ſwade him from coming againe into England, with a purpoſe to increaſe the diviſion between the King and Parlia­ment,3 yet ſhe did refuſe to give him her bleſsing, who went about ſo wicked a deſigne.

Not long ſince the Queene of Bohe­mia ſent to the Parliament, to acquaint them that the twelve thouſand pounds a yeere which ſhe had wont to receive as a ſtipend from England, ſince theſe diſtractions betweene his Majeſty and the Parliament have happened, hath not been paid; which the Parliament have taken into conſideration, and notwith­ſtanding all thoſe ill offices which are done here by her ſonne Prince Robert, yet ſo ſoone as his Majeſty wilbe pleaſed to paſſe the Bill for Tonnage and Poun­dage, which hath been a long time with his Majeſty, out of which it is to bee paid, or the preſent diſtempers a little o­ver, ſhe ſhould have the ſame.

Oh Tueſday the 27. of September, a letter was read in the Parliament Houſe which came from the Prince Paltſgrave, ſent to the Houſe of Peeres, wherein he makes a Declaration of his carriage4 in England while he was with his Ma­jeſtie, ſhewing to their Lordſhips, that he had oftentimes perſwaded and coun­ſelled his Majeſtie to hearken to the ad­vice of his great Counſell, the high and honourable Court of Parliament, and to return unto them, and that during all the time that he continued in England, hee did never uſe any meanes either by words or actions to increaſe the diffe­rence betweene his Majeſtie and the Parliament, but as much as in him lay, had uſed all poſsible endeavours to the contrary: neither ſince his going into Holland had hee beene an occaſion of ſending over any ammunition, or other proviſion for warre, to bee imployed againſt the Parliament. Hee further declared unto their Lordſhips, that he was in great want of moneyes, deſiring their Lordſhips to conſider, that there hath beene but little ſupply had out of England lately, and therefore intreated their Lordſhips to let him have a thou­ſand pound for the ſupply of his preſent5 neceſsities. Which Letter the Lords communicated to the Houſe of Com­mons, deſiring that they would joyne with them in an Order, that the foreſaid Prince Paltſgrave might have a thouſand pound, in regard the ſum he deſired was not great, but only to furniſh his preſent occaſions: which after ſome debate in the Houſe of Commons, they joyned with the Lords in the ſaid Order, and it was done accordingly.

The Marqueſſe of Hartford when he fled from Sherburne, marched toward Bruton in Somerſetſhire, but the next day turned his courſe toward Minyard, and the Earle of Bedford purſued after him with his troupes, following after him with a continuall alarum, with the aſsiſtance of the countrey, and ſent a poſt before to Minyard to ſtop his paſſage into Wales by ſea, and ſo purſued him to the town: but finding no paſſage to get over into Wales, as he intended, he poſ­ſeſſed himſelfe of a ſtrong Inne in the ſaid town, & there for the preſent ſtands6 upon his guard: the Earle of Bedford with his Forces came to the ſaid towne, and continues there: and a great num­ber alſo of the Trained Bands of ſeverall countreyes neere adjacent are come thi­ther, ſo that the Marqueſſe will finde it very hard to give them the ſlip the third time; for he dares not look out of the doores, he is ſo cloſely beſet: and were it not for feare of burning downe the towne, they would quickly force him and his company out of the houſe: but within two or three dayes it is ſuppoſed that hunger will bring them forth to fight, rather then they will ſtarve: and therefore we may aſſure our ſelves, that by the next Poſt we ſhall heare that the Earle of Bedford hath taken them.

FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA declaration of the Prince Paltsgrave, to the high court of Parliament concerning the cause of his departure out of England in these times of distractions, and the manner of his cariage and behaviour during the time of his continuance with His Majesty in the north. Likewise his earnest request to the Parliament, and the Parliaments answer thereunto: declared in his letter to the House of Peeres on Tuesday last. Also the Queen of Bohemia her resolution concerning Prince Roberts coming into England against the Parliament. Likewise a true relation, shewing how the Marquesse of Hartford and his company are beset by the Earle of Bedford and his forces.
Author[unknown]
Extent Approx. 7 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online text creation partnership.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A82215)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 153898)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Early English books, 1641-1700 ; 247:E119[18]; 2387:12)

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA declaration of the Prince Paltsgrave, to the high court of Parliament concerning the cause of his departure out of England in these times of distractions, and the manner of his cariage and behaviour during the time of his continuance with His Majesty in the north. Likewise his earnest request to the Parliament, and the Parliaments answer thereunto: declared in his letter to the House of Peeres on Tuesday last. Also the Queen of Bohemia her resolution concerning Prince Roberts coming into England against the Parliament. Likewise a true relation, shewing how the Marquesse of Hartford and his company are beset by the Earle of Bedford and his forces. [2], 6 p. Printed for J. Greene,[London] :October 1. 1642.. (A third-person narrative account only.) (Place of publication from Wing.) (Reproduction of original in the Henry E. Huntington Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Rupert, -- Prince, Count Palatine, 1619-1682 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Bedford, William Russell, -- Duke of, 1613-1700 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Somerset, William Seymour, -- Duke of, 1588-1660 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Elizabeth, -- Queen, consort of Frederick I, King of Bohemia, 1596-1662.
  • Karl Ludwig, -- Elector Palatine, 1617-1680 -- Early works to 1800.
  • England and Wales. -- Parliament -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Early works to 1800.

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  • Text Creation Partnership,
ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2014-11 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • DLPS A82215
  • STC Wing D740A
  • STC Thomason E119_18
  • STC ESTC R3429
  • EEBO-CITATION 99896299
  • PROQUEST 99896299
  • VID 153898
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