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THE PARLIAMENTS DESIRES TO THE EARL OF WARWICKE: Wherein is Declared their Reſolutions concer­ning his going in Perſon to Hull, with 6. or 8. ſhips.

Together with the Earl of Warwicks Anſwer to the Parliaments Commands.

Alſo a Letter from the Earl of Warwick to the High Court of Parliament, read in the Houſe of Commons upon Monday, concerning his taking of two ſhips upon the Sea, there being in one 42. Pieces of Ordinance, and great ſtore of Ammu­nition for Warre.

With the Parliaments Determination concer­ning all thoſe that ſhall take up Arms.

Ordered that this be printed and publiſhed.

Hen. Elſing. Cler. Parl. D. Com.

July 21. LONDON, Printed for Edward Iohnſon.

THE Earle of Warwicks Reſolution concerning Sir John Hotham.

MAny and ſundry times hath flying Reports arrived in this King­dome, and hath ſo farre dived into the hearts of the Subjects of this Nation, that they have bin much perplexed in mind, fearing a forreign in­vaſion.

But praiſed be God he hath prevented theſe Deſigns, and hath of his gracious af­fection which he bears to this Iland, be­ſtowed his bleſſings in abundance upon us, proſpering us with ſuch gracious gifts, that no Nations under the Sun ever en­joyed the like.

And hath alſo out of his Divine Provi­dence diſcovered many deſperate Deſigns, which were plotted and intended againſt this Kingdom.

And hath alſo diſcovered many more Helliſh Conſpiracies, plotted by great per­ſons that were in emminent places, who when he ſee a ſit and convenient time, diſ­cloſed their wicked intentions, and revea­led it to the hearts of this our Honoura­ble Aſſembly, who out of their vigilant & judicious Care diſanulled them of their places, and hath choſen many worthy, pi­ous, and Religious men for the enjoying therof.

But becauſe I will not deviate too ſarre from my intended purpoſe, I will now proceed to my following Relation.

Both Houſes having taken in conſide­ration the Affairs of Hull, ſent a Meſſage to the Earl of Warwick, concerning the ſame.

And they alſo received Letters from the ſaid Earl, which were read in the audience of both houſes, informing them, how that he had taken one of the Kings ſhips cal­led the Lyon, which was comming from Holland with great ſtore of Ammunition, and as he thought, and conjectured, bound for the North.

In which ſhip were Prince Robert, and his Brother Prince Maurice ſhipped to come for England, but being taken ſick at Sea, and troubled with an extreame vomi­ting of Blood, they returned back, and lan­ded again in another part of Holland.

But the Captain of the ſhip having in­telligence that the Ear of Warwick had de­livered up the Navie to the King, and that it was now under the Command of Sir John Pennington, came very couragiouſly amongſt the ſhips, and very boldly came aboord the Admirall, where he finding the Earl of Warwicke, and underſtanding hee had ſtill the Charge of the Navie (which he would not beleeve untill he had ſeed his Com­miſſion) was much amazed, and at the firſt refuſed to ſubmit himſelf, but the Earle of Warwick took him Priſoner, and poſſeſſed himſelfe of his ſhip and Ammunition, wherin was 42. pieces of Ordinance, with a great quantiry of other proviſions.

Hee alſo informed by the ſaid Letters, that hee had taken another ſhip loaden with Powder, and in it many other things belonging to warre, which was alſo bound for the North.

And upon Tueſday both Houſes Orde­red, that there ſhould a Meſſage forthwith be ſent with all ſpeed to the Earl of War­wicke, informing him the will and plea­ſure of both Houſes, which was, that hee ſhould take ſix or eight ſhips, and go him­ſelf down to HUL, and lye thereabouts to relieve Sir John Hotham.

And alſo Ordered, That he ſhould bring from HULL all ſuch great Saddles as are there, or other Furuiture for Horſe or Horſemen, and the four Priſoners that Sir John Hotham tooke in a ſhip going for Holland.

The Earl of Warwick having received this Command from both Houſes, Hee called a Councell of Warre, and after ſome Debate therof, he reſolved to ſend an An­ſwer to the ſaid Meſſage, informing that he had called a Counſell of Warre to con­ſult of their laſt Commands concerning his going to Hull, but found that he could not conveniently go himſelf, partly be­cauſe his ſhip was of ſo great Burthen, ſhe could not ſafely ride in that ſhallow Wa­ter to continue but he had ſent two of his ſhips, and would take order to ſend o­thers after them, who ſhould carefully ob­ſerve their Commands in all points, and fulfill it accordingly.

And likewiſe certified them, that he had ſent three other ſhips to HULL to re­lieve Sir John Hotham, and deſired them, that they would bee pleaſed to ſend him moneyes with all ſpeed, for to pay certain Captains diſcharged by him, by reaſon that they refuſe to obey his Command.

Wherupon both Houſes Ordered, That there ſhould be fifteen hundred pounds forthwith ſent.

Where it was alſo Voted, and joyntly concluded of, that the ſaid Earl ſhould have Thanks returned unto him for that good ſervice, which was according concluded of and a Meſſenger fortwith diſpatched.

Both Houſes reſolved, That when ſoever the King maketh War upon the Parliament, it is a Breach of the Truſt repoſed in him by his peo­ple, contrary to his Oath, and tending to the diſ­ſolution of this Government.

And alſo Reſolved. That whoſoever ſhall ſerve or aſſiſt him in ſuch Warres, are Tray­tors, &c.

Ordered that this be printed and publiſhed.

John Brown Cler. Parl.

About this transcription

TextThe Parliaments desires to the Earl of Warwicke wherein is declared their resolutions concerning his going in person to Hull, with 6. or 8. ships. Together with the Earl of Warwicks answer to the Parliaments commands. Also a letter from the Earl of Warwick to the High Court of Parliament, read in the House of Commons upon Monday, concerning his taking of two ships upon the sea, there being in one 42. pieces of ordinance, and great store of ammunition for warre. With the Parliaments determination concerning all those that shall take up arms. Ordered that this be printed and published. Hen. Elsing. Cler. Parl. D. Com.
AuthorWarwick, Robert Rich, Earl of, 1587-1658., ; England and Wales. Parliament..
Extent Approx. 7 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A83352)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 133267)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Early English books, 1641-1700 ; 2498:11)

About the source text

Bibliographic informationThe Parliaments desires to the Earl of Warwicke wherein is declared their resolutions concerning his going in person to Hull, with 6. or 8. ships. Together with the Earl of Warwicks answer to the Parliaments commands. Also a letter from the Earl of Warwick to the High Court of Parliament, read in the House of Commons upon Monday, concerning his taking of two ships upon the sea, there being in one 42. pieces of ordinance, and great store of ammunition for warre. With the Parliaments determination concerning all those that shall take up arms. Ordered that this be printed and published. Hen. Elsing. Cler. Parl. D. Com. Warwick, Robert Rich, Earl of, 1587-1658., England and Wales. Parliament.. [8] p. July 21. London, printed for Edward Iohnson,[London] :[1642]. (Reproduction of original in the Folger Shakespeare Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Hotham, John, -- Sir, d. 1645 Jan. 2 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Warwick, Robert Rich, -- Earl of, 1587-1658 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2012-10 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing E2135B
  • STC ESTC R231805
  • EEBO-CITATION 99897490
  • PROQUEST 99897490
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