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A Joyfull MESSAGE Sent from the Houſe of COMMONS to ROBERT Earle of WARVVICKE, Admirall of His Majeſties Navie Royall, concer­ning the Ships which now lye ready at the Coaſt of Holland laden with Ammuniti­on, to be ſent to His Majeſty at YORKE.

With the MESSAGE which they ſent to the Dutch Ambaſſadour, And his Anſwer to the ſaid Meſſage.

Likewiſe the Report which was made to both HOVSES, concerning 8000 men which are to be ſent from France, and Spaine, to His Maje­ſty to aſſiſt him againſt the High Court of Parliament, And the Parliaments Re­ſolution concerning the ſame.

Ordered by the Lords and Commons, that this be Printed and publiſhed throughout the Kingdome.

John Browne Cler. Parl.

LONDON, Printed for J. H. and T. Ryder, Iuly 9. 1642.

A Joyfull Meſſage ſent from the Honourable Houſe of Commons, to Robert, Earle of Warwicke, Admirall of his Maieſties Navie Royall.

THe manifold de­ſtractions of this Kingdome are great, and the diſturbances of this Iland are manifeſtly and apparently un­derſtood, and by ſad experience made knowne to the world, inſomuch that all Nations doe reioyce, which are Enemies to the Peace of great Brittaine, but I hope all thoſe that are Enemies to Sion will have their wages paid by the Di­vell that ſet them at worke, for their mallicious ſpleene againſt this Kingdome hath beene long intended, and now of late tis burſt out in abundance, God grant all thoſe that goe about, and ſeeke the deſtruction of this Kingdome, and of our gracious Soveraigne King Charles, may be utterly confounded, and brought to deſtruction.

What a ſad and lamentable thing it is, for the Subjects of England to thinke that a civill Warre ſhould begin in the Kingdome, who are now at Peace with all the Princes in the World, no inten­tion to take up Armes, but the malig­nant Party ſeparating his Maieſty from his great Councell, the High Court of Parliament, and creating a miſunderſtan­ding betweene his Maieſty and them, it is greatly to be feared that the effects will be fatall, for it is a knowne maxime, that Jealuoſie is the Mother of diſſenti­on, diſsention that nouriſhes diſtraction, and diſtraction inteſtine warre, nay a civill Warre, in compariſoo of which none is more bloody, and uncivill, and the diſtractions of this Kingdome de­clare that we have great cauſe to feare that the ſame effects will inſue.

For intelligence hath beene given to the Houſe, of great ſtore of Armes and Ammunition, to be tranſported to New­caſtle, for his Maieſties defence, likewiſe diuerſe pieces of Ordnance, and many other things belonging to warre, like­wiſe many Captaines are ready to be tranſported over to ſerve the King, who have taken an Oath amongſt themſelves that if they be ſet upon by the way, they will fight it out to the laſt man.

Likewiſe there was a report made to the Houſe of Commons, that there is great preparations made both in France, and Spaine, for the raiſing of an Army to be tranſported to his Majeſty, to aſiſt him againſt the Parliament, and that the Popes Nuncio doth goe about to raiſe Forces for the ſame deſigne.

Therfore both Houſes of Parliament, had great doubt that his Maieſty had ſome Deſigne, for the altering his religi­on.

Likewiſe the Popes Nuntio hath ſoli­cited the Kings of France and Spaine, to lend the King of England foure thouſand men a piece, to helpe to maintaine the Royalty of the King againſt the Parlia­ment, but we hope God will direct his Maieſty better.

Theſe are the chiefe grounds of our Feares.

The Houſe of Commons having taken the aforeſaid reports into ſerious conſi­deration, gave Order that there ſhould be a ſpeedy Meſſage, ſent to to the Earle of Warwicke, intimating unto him the information which they had received, de­ſiring him to have a ſpeciall care there­in, and to ſtop the paſſages of all thoſe which ſhall tranſport Armes or Ammu­nition, from Rome, Venice, Parris, and other neere adioyning parts, as alſo from Holland, there having beene of late great preparations of Inſtruments of warre, ſent over in ſeverall Letters from thence to the high Court of Parliament.

Likewiſe they received more intelli­gence, of certaine Ships laden with Ord­nance and other Ammunition, to be ſent to his Maieſty, and that they are now upon the Sea.

Which Newes doth increaſe the for­row of the Parliament, conſidering the great miſery which is like to fall upon the Kingdome, whereby they are infor­ced (for the prevention of which) to ap­ply themſelves to the uſe of that power which by the Fundamentall Lawes of the Land reſides in them, yet ſtill reſol­ving to keepe themſelves within the bounds of faithfullneſſe and allegiance, to his ſacred Maieſty.

Likewiſe the Honorable Houſes of Parliament thought it convenient, and conduceable to the Peace of the King­dome, for to make further enquiry there­of wherefore they ſent a Meſſage to the Dutch Ambaſſador, to know of him whi­ther there were any ſuch thing, or not, the Meſſenger which carried this Meſſage returning backe, reported to the Houſe the Anſwer that he had received from the ſaid Dutch Ambaſſador, intimating, unto them that he had received no ſuch intelligence from Holland, neither did he know of any ſuch thing.

Ordered by the Lords and Commons aſesmbled in Parliament, that this Letter be forthwith Printed, and publiſhed throughout all the Kingdome.

Iohn Browne, Cler. Parliamentorum.
FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA joyfull message sent from the House of Commons to Robert Earle of Warvvicke, admirall of His Majesties navie royall, concerning the ships which now lye ready at the coast of Holland laden with ammunition, to be sent to His Majesty at Yorke. With the message which they sent to the Dutch ambassadour, and his answer to the said message. Likewise the report which was made to both Houses, concerning 8000 men which are to be sent from France, and Spaine, to His Majesty to assist him against the High Court of Parliament, and the Parliaments resolution concerning the same. Ordered by the Lords and Commons, that this be printed and published throughout the kingdome. John Browne Cler. Parl.
AuthorEngland and Wales. Parliament..
Extent Approx. 6 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online text creation partnership.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A83740)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 156832)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 27:E154[28])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA joyfull message sent from the House of Commons to Robert Earle of Warvvicke, admirall of His Majesties navie royall, concerning the ships which now lye ready at the coast of Holland laden with ammunition, to be sent to His Majesty at Yorke. With the message which they sent to the Dutch ambassadour, and his answer to the said message. Likewise the report which was made to both Houses, concerning 8000 men which are to be sent from France, and Spaine, to His Majesty to assist him against the High Court of Parliament, and the Parliaments resolution concerning the same. Ordered by the Lords and Commons, that this be printed and published throughout the kingdome. John Browne Cler. Parl. England and Wales. Parliament.. [8] p. Printed for J. H. and T. Ryder,London :Iuly 9. 1642.. (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Naval operations -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2014-11 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • DLPS A83740
  • STC Wing E2617B
  • STC Thomason E154_28
  • STC ESTC R1852
  • EEBO-CITATION 99860418
  • PROQUEST 99860418
  • VID 156832
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