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A Fuller RELATION OF The taking of Bath by Sir THOMAS FAIRFAX his Forces: With the conditions of the ſurrender.

Sir Thomas Bridges the Governour, and his Officers gone to Briſtoll.

Taken therein,

  • 200. Priſoners.
  • 300. Armes.
  • 6. Pieces of Ordnance.
  • 10. Barrels of Powder.
  • 10. Barrels of Match, and much Ammunition.
  • Divers heapes of Bullet.
  • Great ſtore of Beefe, Corne, and other proviſions.
  • The Standard colours upon the Fort-Royall, and all other Colors in the Town.

ALSO,

The proceedings of the Scottiſh Army, and their march towards Monmouth after the King. With the manner of the Kings eſcape at the late taking of 80. of His Life-guard at Black-rock, intending to paſſe over Severne.

Publiſhed by Authority.

LONDON, Printed for Thomas Bates, at the ſigne of the Mayden-head on Snow-hill neere Holborn-conduit. 1645.

1

A Letter from a Gentleman of Glo­ceſter to his friend in London.

SIR,

FOr newes here, the Scots Army are now quartered upon the Forreſt ſide of Deane, their head-quarters at Ludbury; yeſterday their foot had a Rendezvouz at Newant. I doubt not but you have already heard of their taking of Cannon Froome, where moſt of the enemy refuſing quarter were put to the Sword. Collonell Harvey is appointed by the Generall to garriſon the place with the foot he hath rai­ſed in this County, and our Committee here doe furniſh him with Powder and Armes for the gar­riſon of Cannon Froome. The Scots had intel­ligence that the King is paſſed over the River of2 Severne at blacke Rock towards Briſtoll, it is conceived they intend to follow him. It is cre­dibly informed here, that 80 horſe endeavou­ring to paſſe over the Severne at blacke Rocke were this weeke taken by the Parliaments Fri­got, or ſhallop, the countrey-people there doe ſay it was the Kings, Life-guard, and that his Majeſty upon their taking drew back. There are many of the Welſh quartered about Briſtoll on this ſide of it, and Prince Rupert labours excee­dingly in fortifying the Towne; he hath had ſeverall meetings with the Wiltſhire and ſome Somerſetſhire Clubmen upon Lanſdowne, but they refuſed to take up Armes, or joyne with him, to which he preſt them very earneſtly. This day the Scots brought their ſicke and hurt men into this Towne (the L. Generall Leven having before ſpoken with our Governour a­bout it) they are this day marching through the Forreſt ſide towards Monmouth. Sir, This is all for the preſent from him, who is,

Yours, &c.
3

A Letter from the Army to a Gentleman in London.

SIR,

IT having ſo pleaſed the Almighty ſtill to goe along with us, and to proſper our adventures in theſe parts, I thought good, having ſo fit an opportunity to make you acquainted with the late ſucceſſefull proceedings of our Army. Our Generall Sir Thomas Fairfax his head­quarters is at Wels, from whence he hath ſent a party againſt Sherburne, and another party of two Regiments of Horſe and two Companies of Dragoones under the command of the ever-honoured Colonell Rich toward Bath to view the Towne, and give them an account thereof. 4At the approach of Colonell Riches Dragoones neere the Towne on Tueſday laſt, and com­ming downe the hill at the bridge end the enemy in Bath tooke an Alarm and diſcharged their Ordnance, whereupon ſome of our Dra­goones let fly at them their Musket-ſhot, and thereupon ſent them a ſummons, upon which (ſo great a terrour the Almighty ſtrucke into the enemies hearts) that although there were none of our ſouldiers on the other ſide of the Towne, yet the next morning the enemy ſent for a parley; At which they agreed to ſur­render the City, with all the common ſouldiers, Ordnance, Armes and Amunition therein to our Forces upon this prety condition onely; That Sir Thomas Bridges the ſtout Governour thereof, and his brave ſpirited Officers ſhould march to Briſtoll, which was condeſcended unto by our Forces, who thereupon entred the Towne tooke therein ſix peeces of Ordnance, 200 common priſoners, 300 Armes, ten Bar­rells of Powder and other Ammunition and pro­viſions. Colonell Maſſey is gone with 8000 horſe and foote towards Exeter, from whence we heare the enemy have drawne their horſe and foo••out into the field, and ſome field Peeces5 into their out-Workes, the intentions of the enemy are as is conceived to joyne all their forces together, the better to inable them (if they cannot avoid it) to give us Battell.

The report here is, that Prince Rupert went Tueſday laſt out of Briſtoll, and is not ſince heard off, the valiant German hath behaved himſelfe ſo gallantly that hee is ſhamed to ſhevv his head. The enemy in Briſtoll are much diſtract for feare of our forces.

A Liſt of the particulars taken in Bathe by Sir Thomas Fairfax forces.

  • TWo hundred priſoners.
  • Three hundred Armes.
  • Six pieces of Ordnance.
  • Ten barrels of Powder.
  • Ten Barrels of Match, and much Ammunition.
  • Divers heaps of Bullets.
  • Great ſtore of Beefe, Corne, and other proviſions.
  • The Standard colours upon the Fort-Royall, and all other Colours in the Towne.
FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA fuller relation of the taking of Bath by Sir Thomas Fairfax his forces: with the conditions of the surrender. Sir Thomas Bridges the governour, and his officers gone to Bristoll. Taken therein, 200. prisoners. 300. armes. 6. pieces of ordnance. 10. barrels of powder. 10. barrels of match, and much ammunition. Divers heapes of bullet. Great store of beefe, corne, and other provisions. The standard colours upon the fort-royall, and all other colors in the town. Also, the proceedings of the Scottish army, and their march towards Monmouth after the king. With the manner of the kings escape at the late taking of 80. of his life-guard at Black-rock, intending to passe over Severne. Published by authority.
Author[unknown]
Extent Approx. 7 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1645
SeriesEarly English books online text creation partnership.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A85042)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 113124)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 48:E294[30])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA fuller relation of the taking of Bath by Sir Thomas Fairfax his forces: with the conditions of the surrender. Sir Thomas Bridges the governour, and his officers gone to Bristoll. Taken therein, 200. prisoners. 300. armes. 6. pieces of ordnance. 10. barrels of powder. 10. barrels of match, and much ammunition. Divers heapes of bullet. Great store of beefe, corne, and other provisions. The standard colours upon the fort-royall, and all other colors in the town. Also, the proceedings of the Scottish army, and their march towards Monmouth after the king. With the manner of the kings escape at the late taking of 80. of his life-guard at Black-rock, intending to passe over Severne. Published by authority. [2], 5, [1] p. Printed for Thomas Bates, at the signe of the Mayden-head on Snow-hill neere Holborn-conduit.,London, :1645.. (Annotation on Thomason copy: "Aug: 4th".) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Bath (England) -- History -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649.

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  • Text Creation Partnership,
ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2014-11 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • DLPS A85042
  • STC Wing F2492
  • STC Thomason E294_30
  • STC ESTC R200192
  • EEBO-CITATION 99860997
  • PROQUEST 99860997
  • VID 113124
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