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A GREAT VICTORY OBTAINED By His Highneſſe the Prince of Wales neer the Downs, againſt a Squadron of the Rebels Shipping, on Munday laſt: with the particulars of the Fight, 200. killed, 500. taken priſoners, two of their Ships ſunk, five boarded, 40. piece of Ordnance taken, and all their Arms and Ammunition, And the Princes Reſolution touching the Earl of Warwick.

Likewiſe, the executing of Sir Charles Lucas on Munday night laſt, and the ſentence of the Councell of War againſt him to be ſhot to death. Alſo, a bloudy Fight between the Engliſh and Scottiſh Forces, commanded by Lieu. Gen. Cromwel and Gen. Monro, Aug. 27. the particulars therof, & number kiled.

[illustration]

August 31. Printed for R. VV. Anno Dom. 1648.

1

Another FIGHT IN The North, between the two Armies of England and Scotland, commanded by Lieutenant General Cromwel, and Major Generall Monro. Vpon Sunday last, beingthe 27. of this inſtant Moneth of Auguſt, 1648.

Honored Sir,

IN my laſt, bearing date Aug. 19. I acquainted you of the defearing of the Scottiſh Army, by Lieut. Gen. Cromwel and his Forces; ſince which time, our Intelligencer ſaith, he hath had another great Fight with the reſt of their. Forces in the North, command­d by Major General Monro, and the Earl of Kalender,2 the manner thus. Major Generall Monro, and the Earl of Kalender being joyned, whoſe ſudden conjunction inviteth many of the ſcattered Forces, and others, to their aſſiſtance, and having a very conſiderable Body, advances from the Frontier parts, as far as Kendall in Weſtmerland, where they met with ſome oppoſition, a party of Lieutenant Generall Cromwels horſe charging the Scots forlorn of Horſe, commanded by Colonell Monro, the Major Generals kinſman, whoſe deport­ment and gallantry in the Fight (to give the Divell his due) were exceeding great, diſplaying the Banners of Mars, and charging quite through our Body of Horſe, his men likewiſe fought reſolutely, diſputing the place with great courage, and maintained their paſſes with­out the loſſe of the leaſt ground. Our men likewiſe fought reſolutely, ſtrove for victory, and defended themſelves like renowned Heroes, but being over­powred, made an honourable retreat with little loſſe, the enemy were ſo galled, that they durſt not maintain the purſuit.

This action hapned on Sunday morning laſt about 8 of the clock in the morning, the loſſe being equall; on our part were ſlain 13. and nine wounded, and as ma­ny of the Scots.

We expect a ſudden engagement between the two Armies, both being reſolved to ſight, the Scots Army is ſaid to be about 6000. Monro commanding in chief, being reſolved to fight, and ſaith, That hee will ſhew Cromwell School play.

Indeed hee hath four thouſand reſolute old ſoldiers, which he brought out of Ireland with him, who hath3 been a long time exercized and trained in the Diſci­pline of War.

But notwithſtanding all which, our men feares them not, as appears by the fore-going action, who diſputed the ground at great odds and diſadvantage, and made good their retreat with little loſſe.

The Lieutenant Generals Army conſiſts of about five thouſand, all armed, and well diſciplin'd, the coun­try riſing for him whereſoever he commeth, and aſſi­ſting him with all neceſſaries whatſoever.

But Generall Monro to gain the affections of the Country People, hath made Proclamation at the head of each Regiment, and ſet forth a Declaration to the Inhabitants, intimating,

That any ſouldier whatſoever that ſhall uſe any vio­lence or injury to any of the Inhabitants, or plunder, or take away any goods whatſoever, to the value of two pence under any pretence, ſhall immediatly be tryed by Marſhal Law, and die for it.

We hear that Monro hath ſent a meſſage to the king­dom of Scotland, deſiring, That ſome additionall forces may be forthwith raiſed and ſent unto him, and that care be taken for proviſions and other neceſsaries for mainte­nance of the Army.

The two Caſtles of Scarbrough and Pontefract holds out ſtill, and are very reſolute and obſtinate, ſlighting the Lieutenant Generals Summons, which is all at preſent, from.

Your most aſsured friend, P. MITCHEL.
4

A great Victory obtained at Sea, by his Highneſſe the Prince of Wales, against the Rebel­lious Shipping.

Noble Sir,

YEſterday we received intelligence from the Princes Navy, that upon the diſcovery of divers Ships at Sea, Captain Batten received Commiſſion from his Highneſſe, to fight with them, and upon Sun­day morning laſt, weighed anchor, hoyſted ſayl, and made towards them with a gallant Squadron of ſhips, viz. the Swallow, the Constant Warwick, the Roe-Buck, the Pellican, the Blackmoe Lady, and ſome others, who upon ſight thereof, the Rebels ſhips held off, and were loath to engage, Captain ctatten perceiving this, com­manded forth the Swallow the Warwick, and the Roe-Buck, who after three leagues ſayle, came within ſhot of them, gave them a broad ſide, & engaged, inſo­much that there hapned a very fierce and tedious fight continuing for the ſpace of 7 hours, and with great gallantry and reſolution; but after an hours diſpute, the reſt of the ſhipping came up, and gave the Rebels ſeverall broad ſides, ſinking two of them, and boarded the reſt, diſputing the Conqueſt above Decks, killing many, caſting them into the Sea, the reſt cryed for quarter, and ſubmitted to mercy.

5In this fight it is reported, that the Prince loſt not many men, the enemies were great, above 200. ſlain, and neeer upon 500. taken priſoners, three ſhips ſunk, and four boarded, and ſecured, above 50. piece of Ordnance, and great ſtore of Arms and Ammunition, and other rich Booty, which they had taken from di­vers Engliſh Marchants, and others, being all of them Iriſh Pyrats and robbers at Sea.

It is reported here, that the Earl of Warwick intends to put to Sea very ſuddenly, and that the Prince is re­ſolved to fight with him, and hath ſent ſeverall ſhips to attend his motion.

Here is great joy for the Conqueſt in the North, by defeating of the Scottiſh Army, and totally routing the whole Infantry; for it is ſaid, there actions were moſt barbarous and inhumane, and that the Burthens and Oppreſſions of the people were ſo inſufferable, that no Tongue or Pen is able to expreſſe them.

O monſtrous and inhumane Creatures! who make Religion their Cloak of knavery, and in ſtead of exe­cuting Juſtice and mercy, proſecuteth nothing but Bloud-thirſtineſſe and cruelty.

They have divers Agents in theſe parts, who have been very active to withdraw the hearts of the Peo­ple from the obedience of Parliament, and queſtion­leſſe, might have been very prevalent and powerfull, had not God appeared even in the nick and height of their deſign, who having blaſted their ſtratagems, and Hell bred devices, they are vaniſhed like ſmoak, &c.

6

This day came newes of the ſurrendring of the City of Colcheſter, and of the Parliaments forces poſſeſſing themſelves thereof on Tueſday laſt, together with all the Ordnance, Arms, and Ammunition, the inferiour Officers and Souldiers to go home, the great Ones to ſubmit to mercy, who upon their delivery up to the Lord Fairfax, it is ſaid, that a Councell of War were called, and after ſome debate touching the proceedings and engagement of Sir Charles Lucas, the ſentence paſ­ſed, and he was adjudged to be ſhot to death, which (as is reported) was accordingly executed upon Tueſday laſt.

FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA great victory obtained by His Highnesse the Prince of Wales neer the Downs, against a squadron of the rebels shipping, on Munday last: with the particulars of the fight, 200. killed, 500. taken prisoners, two of their ships sunk, five boarded, 40 piece of ordnance taken, and all their arms and ammunition, and the princes resolution touching the Earl of Warwick. Likewise, the executing of Sir Charles Lucas on Munday night last, and the sentence of the Councell of War against him to be shot to death. Also, a bloudy fight between the English and Scottish forces, commanded by Lieu. Gen. Cromwel and Gen. Monro, Aug. 27. the particulars therof, & number kiled.
AuthorMitchel, P..
Extent Approx. 9 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1648
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A85637)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 162219)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 74:E463[13])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA great victory obtained by His Highnesse the Prince of Wales neer the Downs, against a squadron of the rebels shipping, on Munday last: with the particulars of the fight, 200. killed, 500. taken prisoners, two of their ships sunk, five boarded, 40 piece of ordnance taken, and all their arms and ammunition, and the princes resolution touching the Earl of Warwick. Likewise, the executing of Sir Charles Lucas on Munday night last, and the sentence of the Councell of War against him to be shot to death. Also, a bloudy fight between the English and Scottish forces, commanded by Lieu. Gen. Cromwel and Gen. Monro, Aug. 27. the particulars therof, & number kiled. Mitchel, P.. [2], 6 p. August 31. Printed for R. VV.,[London] :Anno Dom. 1648.. (Signed on p.3: P. Mitchel.) (Place of publication from Wing.) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Lucas, Charles, -- Sir, 1613-1648.
  • Warwick, Robert Rich, -- Earl of, d. 1659.
  • England and Wales. -- Royal Navy -- Early works to 1800.
  • England and Wales. -- Army -- Early works to 1800.
  • Scotland. -- Army -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing G1776
  • STC Thomason E463_13
  • STC ESTC R205088
  • EEBO-CITATION 99864529
  • PROQUEST 99864529
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