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IOYFVLL NEVVES from Sea: Or good tidings from my Lord of Warwicke, of his encounter with ſome Spaniſh Ships, with the happy ſucceſſe he obtained thereby.

Alſo herein is declared what ſtore of Ammunition, Money, and other neceſ­ſaries for War, were by our Engliſh ſhips taken from them. viz.

  • Muskets 500
  • Swords 507
  • Pikes and halfe Pikes 813
  • Dragoones 99
  • Arms for horſe & foot 150
  • Piſtolls 200
  • Calivers 76
  • Ordnance peices, and murtherers 53
  • and 300000 pound in money.

Manifeſting to the whole Kingdome the wonderfull worke of God, in delivering thoſe that are Traytors to the truth of his Word, and enemies to the true Catholicke and Proteſtant Religion.

Printed at London for William Ley. 1642.

1

Ioyfull Newes from Sea, Manifeſting to the whole Kingdome the wonderfull worke of God, in delivering thoſe that are Traytors to the true Catholick and Proteſtant Religion unto the hands of us his faith­full ſervants, &c.

MY Lord of Warwicke (mſt likeimſelfe) carefull and faithfulln his undertaken Office, feainghe malicious intentions of for­raigne Nations, who daily ſtrive to foot themſelves in the heart of this Kingdome, and to under­mine the whole Land with their Popiſh inventions)2 ſent and ſcattered many of his beſt Ships unto ſeve­rall nooks and armes of the narrow Seas, two whereof, by name the Black Martine, and the Royall Lyon, loſing themſelves from the reſt of their fel­lowes, comming ſome what neare the Iriſh ſ•••e, met with five other ſhips halfe a Leagues diſtance from them which were comming from Spaine, and going either (as it was thought) with Ammuniti­on, and Money to refeſh and relieve the Rebells in Ireland, or elſe ſayling towards England, here to egge and encourage on a Civill diſſention, but our two ſhips perceiving their Flag to be unſutable to ous, and greatly ſuſpecting they had ſome bad in­tentions immediately diſcharged a warning piece, they relying on their number being 5. to two, would not vaile bonnet to ours, reſolved to try it out; our men on the other ſide depending on God (who is ſtill helpfull and aſſiſtant unto all thoſe that relye on him) gave them an incounter, and being very hot in Battaile immediatly did ſinke two of their beſt ſhips, but one of ours (namely the black Martine) being mightily peſtred and bruſed, was (not long after) ſunk; likewiſe the Royall Lyon in the inte­rim (although wounded) did ſo bravely belabour the other three Spaniſh ſhips, that they were quickly faine to yeeld and ſurrender up all they had for the ſafety of their lives; for our men having drove them ſomewhat neare the ſhore, had preſent aſſiſtance by Merchants voyaging thoſe waies; there were falſe Decks in one of the Spaniſh ſhips, by which many of our men were like to ſuffer, but having boarded3 her, there was a great ſum of money found therein, which did neare upon amount to three hundred thouſand pound, the other two ſhips were extraor­dinary fraught with all manner of Warlike A•••­nitions, eſpecia••y Muskets,ikes, halfe〈◊〉, Ca­livers, Dragoones, Swords, Armour for Horſe­men and foot, Piſtolls, the particular ſummes of all which will more plainely appeare in the enſu­ing lines.

  • Muskets 500
  • Swords 507
  • Pikes and halfe Pikes. 813
  • Dragoones. 99
  • Armour for horſe and foot. 150
  • Piſtole 200
  • Calivers 76
  • Ordnance peeces and murtherers 53

As for their number of men they did not fully a­mount to four hundred, who were all brought with their Ammunition to my Lord of Warwicke, and being ſtrictly examined by him, were found in many contrary Tales, upon which my Lord immediately ſent tidings thereof to both Houſes of Parliament, to informe them what he had done, what Amu­nition he had received by thoſe ſaid Ships, and how the Black Martine was ſunke in the enterpriſe, by which many of our men were ſhipwrackt.

4

A true relation of Prince Robert his arrivall to England the miſchance that befell him comming, what forces and ammu­nition were brought with him, and his welcome to his Uncle our ſacred King.

PRince Robert in the midſt of his voyage for England, was chas'd by two or three of my Lord of Warwicks ſhips, which indeed was ignorantly done, in reſpect it was not known what ſhipps they were, where the Prince was from whence they came, whither they went, not upon what occaſion; But having narrowly ſcaped, the Prince landed at Do­ver with a matter of two hundred men or upward, well money'd, the ſumme (amounting to above 100000 pounds) that hee carried with him with5 ſome other martiall ammunition, for the young Prince having intelligence that England was like to be in an uprore, and that the King (his Vncle) did in ſome way ſtand in defect of men and mony, brought with him the greateſt ſtore hee poſſible could make ſhift for, the Ammunition he had was but little, of which moſt were ſwords and piſtolls, with a few pikes, all did not amount to the number of an hun­dred and fifty, with ſixe peeces of Ordnance and 14 horſes, one of which fourteen Prince Robert him­ſelfe did ride upon, the horſe being ſomewhat wild, and the Prince deſirous with all ſpeed to haſten to the Kings Majeſty his Vncle, ſet his horſe ſo to it, that ere he came three miles from Dover he had a moſt dangerous fall, ſo that his ſholder theeby was put out of joynt, and his arme extraordinarily ſprained, but a Surgeon was quickly ſent for, and a bone-ſetter, who by their vigilant induſtry ſoon made whole all thoſe grieved parts, the Prince in ſuch eagerneſſe to ſee his uncle, tooke no more re­ſpite than three or foure dayes, but that immedi­ately hee tooke horſe againe, and riding towards Yorke, had intelligence by the way, that the Kings Majeſty was departed thee hence to one Sir Tho­mas Lees, inhabiting within foure miles of Coven­try, ſo that the Prince was faine to returne thither, no ſooner had our Kings Majeſty intelligence of his comming, but that hee went (accompanied with ſome of the Cavalliers) to meete him, who, when hee met, he courteouſly embraced in his armes, and thanked him for that kindneſſe.

There is a ſhip well fraught with Ammunition and money that was intended for Portſmouth, but being ſhroudly chac'd by ſome of my Lord of War­wickes Commanders, was driven to Southamp­ton, and is there now taken, the money and Am­munition is by my Lords command brought here to London.

FJNJS.

About this transcription

TextIoyfull nevves from sea: or, Good tidings from my Lord of Warwicke, of his encounter with some Spanish ships, with the happy successe he obtained thereby. Also herein is declared what store of ammunition, money, and other necessaries for war, were by our English ships taken from them. viz. muskets 500 swords 507 pikes and halfe pikes 813 dragoones 99 arms for horse & foot 150 pistolls 200 calrvers 76 ordnance peices [sic], and murtherers 53 and 300000 pound in money. Manifesting to the whole kingdome the wonderfull worke of God, in delivering those that are traytors to the truth of his word, and enemies to the true Catholicke and Protestant religion.
Author[unknown]
Extent Approx. 8 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online text creation partnership.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A87408)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 156040)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 20:E116[16])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationIoyfull nevves from sea: or, Good tidings from my Lord of Warwicke, of his encounter with some Spanish ships, with the happy successe he obtained thereby. Also herein is declared what store of ammunition, money, and other necessaries for war, were by our English ships taken from them. viz. muskets 500 swords 507 pikes and halfe pikes 813 dragoones 99 arms for horse & foot 150 pistolls 200 calrvers 76 ordnance peices [sic], and murtherers 53 and 300000 pound in money. Manifesting to the whole kingdome the wonderfull worke of God, in delivering those that are traytors to the truth of his word, and enemies to the true Catholicke and Protestant religion. [2], 5, [1] p. for William Ley,Printed at London :1642.. (Annotation on Thomason copy: "Sept: 8th".) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Warwick, Robert Rich, -- Earl of, 1587-1658 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Naval operations -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2014-11 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing J1144
  • STC Thomason E116_16
  • STC ESTC R9485
  • EEBO-CITATION 99873558
  • PROQUEST 99873558
  • VID 156040
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