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A CERTIFICATE FROM THE Lord Moor and Sir Henry Titchborne, Shewing The certainty of the cleering of the Harbour, and Country, twenty miles about Tredagh, with the taking of Bewly and Stameene Caſtles, from the Rebels.

It is ordered this ſeventh day of April, 1642. By the Committee of the Houſe of Commons in Parlia­ment concerning Printing, that this Certificate be forthwith Printed.

Iohn White.

Whereunto is added, Divers over­throwes given at ſundry times to the Rebels.

London, Printed for Joſeph Hunſcott. 1642.

FOraſmuch as we have been long beſieged in this Town of Drogheda, to the diſ­heartning of the Engliſh Shipping to come into the Harbor, or to traffick, or trade hither; which ſiege we (under God) have now rai­ſed, Inſomuch that we have poſſeſſed our ſelves of the Towns, and Caſtles of Bewley and Stameene on both ſides of the mouth of the Harbour, and have burnt Mornanton; In all which the enemy formerly lay, and endea­voured to block up the River; and have likewiſe ſo beaten the Enemy, that they have no force within 20. miles of this Town, only Dundalk is not yet cleered. Now for the encou­ragement of the Engliſh Shipping and Marchants, we have thought fit to ſignifie thus much, and have ſent this ſmall Ship which we took as a prize, and named (Gods-Gift) fraighted by Maſter James Penteny, and Mr. George Peppard, with Hides and Tallow, to inform the Mar­chants and Marriners of Cheſter, and Lever-pool-water, that they may free­ly traffick and trade hither, and may caſt Ankor, between this harbour and Dublin free, and without inter­ruption, Dated at Drogheda the 15. of March. 1641.

Signed,
  • Moore,
  • Hen. Titchborne.
Sir,

I Wrote to you from Dublin two Letters, wherein I ſhewed you the eſtate of this Kingdom at large, and the miſery theſe rebellious people have run them­ſelves into: But now at this place here is no Aid come over yet, for the Scots have lien this Month within 16 Leagues of this place, and in all this time have not had a winde to bring them over: And when I arrived here ſome 10 dayes ſince, here was not a­bove 700 men, and not Arms for a third part of thoſe neither, nor yet money to pay them; and for my part, I had as little as the leaſt, for I brought but one groat hither: But ſince here is 2 Ships arrived, laden with Ammunition, and 3 Ships laden with Corn from Lon­don, and my Lord Conway and his Troop; ſo now it is ſomewhat amended: But I hope very ſuddenly it will be a great deal better, if once our Ships come with the Scotiſh Forces, and ſome better Governours that will curb theſe Scots; for here hath been great want of good Commanders all this time. But I doubt not, that if the Lord bleſſe us, but that you ſhall ſee this a free Conqueſt in a ſhort time: therefore I could wiſh that you would ſell the houſe at a venture; for if this Kingdom be ſubdued, as I doubt not but that it will, then will here be brave living, and a man with one hundred pounds in his purſe ſhall purchaſe that here, whereupon he may live better than he that hath 100 per annum in England. Corn is very reaſonable now, over it hath been; but the next yeer it will be dear hear, in regard that there hath been none ſown ſince thee Wars; and that that was afore ſown, now will be deſtroyed. And thus deſiring you to remem­ber my duty to my mother, I ſhall ever remain

Your obedient Son, T. K.

IT is credibly reported, That Sir Charles Coot will march out of Dublin with an Army on Monday next to cleare the Country on the other ſide of Dublin.

If we had but men enough to leave in Dublin to ſe­cure it, and were able to march forth with 10000 men. I think we might go all over Ireland; for God hath put ſuch terrour and dread in the hearts of our enemies, that they are afraid to ſtand againſt us; for 500 of them will not ſtand to fight with 100. Our ſouldiers are all very reſolute and couragious, and they want nothing but their pay, which they have not received theſe ſeven weeks laſt paſt.

FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA certificate from the Lord Moor and Sir Henry Titchborne, shewing the certainty of the cleering of the harbour, and country, twenty miles about Tredagh, with the taking of Bewly and Stameene castles, from the rebels. It is ordered this seventh day of April, 1642. by the Committee of the House of Commons in Parliament concerning printing, that this certificate be forthwith printed. Iohn White. Whereunto is added, divers overthrowes given at sundry times to the rebels.
AuthorMoore of Drogheda, Charles Moore, Viscount, 1603-1643..
Extent Approx. 7 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1642
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A89254)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 156583)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 25:E142[16])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA certificate from the Lord Moor and Sir Henry Titchborne, shewing the certainty of the cleering of the harbour, and country, twenty miles about Tredagh, with the taking of Bewly and Stameene castles, from the rebels. It is ordered this seventh day of April, 1642. by the Committee of the House of Commons in Parliament concerning printing, that this certificate be forthwith printed. Iohn White. Whereunto is added, divers overthrowes given at sundry times to the rebels. Moore of Drogheda, Charles Moore, Viscount, 1603-1643., T. K., Tichborne, Henry, Sir, 1581?-1667., England and Wales. Parliament. House of Commons.. [8] p. Printed for Joseph Hunscott,London :1642.. (A letter from Carrickfergus, April 2, 1642, p. 7 is signed: T.K.) (Signatures: A⁴.) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Ireland -- History -- Rebellion of 1641 -- Early works to 1800.

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  • Text Creation Partnership,
ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • DLPS A89254
  • STC Wing M2534
  • STC Thomason E142_16
  • STC ESTC R18980
  • EEBO-CITATION 99860522
  • PROQUEST 99860522
  • VID 156583
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