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A BLOODY FIGHT IN SCOTLAND WITHIN Two miles of Edenburgh, ſince Lieut. Gen. Cromwel returned into England. The Malignants rize and fell upon Col. Gen. Lam­berts men, but were repulſed and routed.

Alſo inſtructions for the Lord Libberton, and Col. Innis, to treat with Col. Lambert. With a Commiſſion for divers Lords to give ſatisfaction to the ENGLISH

And a Proclamation publiſhed through the Kingdome of Scotland for ſuch, their goods to bee confiſcate, and themſelves puniſhed with Death.

WEE doe command and Ordain theſe preſents to bee publiſhed at the Market Croſſe of Edenburgh, Haddington, Dunbarre, Lenilithgow, and Peebles, That none pretend Ignorance.

THO. HENDERSON.

EDENBURGH, Firſt printed by Evan Tylar Printer to the Kings moſt Excellent Majeſty. And Re-printed at London by Robert Ibbitſon, 1648.

1

A Bloody Fight in Scotland, within two miles of Edenburgh, ſince Lieut Gen. Cromwell returned into England.

SIR,

I Beleeve that you have ſeen the Declara­tion of the Committee of Eſtates, con­cerning the late Engagement, being (as I underſtand) ſent from Edenburgh by the laſt Poſt, ſo that I need not acquaint you therewith. Divers of our Souldiers have lately had particular injuries offered to them, by being ſet upon in the high-wayes, and other places, by ſome looſe and deſperate perſons, in this kingdome. Many of their horſes have been taken away, ſtolne, &c. and o­ther things, and truely there is ſuch watchings, and way-laying of us, that wee dare not ſtirre without a good company together, nor then neither without be­ing cock't and prim'd, and reſolute to meet with ſome encounter, before we come to our journeys end. Par­ticularly, 6 of Major Gen. Lamberts Regiment, with one Quarter-maſter Dimond, that commanded them,2 were ſet upon by 14 or 15 of theſe Rogues, at the ſhut­ting up of the Evening, within 2 miles of Edenburgh, the other as ſoon as they diſcovered ours to be Engliſh having the advantage of their ſwords ready drawn un­der their cloaks, imediately fel upon them with ſword and Piſtoll, ours not much unready, nor turning their backes becauſe of their number, preſently fell to de­fending themſelves, they fought with them about a quarter of an houre, laid three of them ſprawling up­on the ground, wounded moſt of the reſt, routed them and came off without any hurt, ſave onely their de­fenſive Armes were ſoundly wounded, and one that had a cut on his hand.

Many of the like happen, but our men being now upon their conſtant watch ſeldome come off with the worſt, you ſee in what danger notwithſtanding wee are in by ſuch private lurking Enemies as theſe are. Nevertheleſſe the Committee of Eſtates have taken theſe things into conſideration, and uſed meanes to give ſatisfaction to all our loſſes in this kind, and to prevent the like for the future, as by the incloſed pa­per you will perceive, which hath given us ſome in­couragement.

But we hope our ſtay here will not be long now, a­bout 14 dayes may give us a diſmiſſion, though thoſe that are well affected to this Committee of Eſtates are jealous that the Malignant party watch but the op­pertunity of our departure and then to ſhew them­ſelves again, and that is the cauſe that by the advan­tage of our preſence the Committee of Eſtates think fit to put themſelves into a poſture of defence by con­tinuing a ſtanding force for the ſuppreſſing & keeping3 down of that party, in caſe they doe attempt any ſuch thing, Within this 14 daies they will have com­pleated about 600 Horſe in ſeverall Troopes, 4000 Foote, and tis conceived old Leſlewill have the com­mand in cheife. The next convention of Parliament begins in January, for which the Members in the ſe­verall Shires are already moſt of them elected, and thoſe that are wel affected to the preſent Committee ſay they are moſt of them well choſen, ſo that the cruſhed party muſt expect to be more trampled on.

This Poſt I received none from you, but by the laſt I did receive one after I had ſent mine away. I be­leave ſome letters both of yours and mine have miſ­carried,

I am, Sir
Your aſſured Friend, Tho. Margetts.

October 10. 1648.Inſtructions for the Laird of Libber­ton, and Collonel Innis.

YOu ſhall repaire to Major General Lambert, and other Officers of the Engliſh Troop, and ende­vour to keepe a right correſpondence betwixt this Committee and them, And communicate their De­mands to us, and our Deſires to them, as occaſion ſhall require.

You ſhall likewiſe indevour to keep a right under­ſtanding4 betwixt them and the Country, and prevent all occaſions of complaint or diſ­content.

You ſhall take care that the Quarterings be ordered in ſuch manner as may bee beſt for our occaſions, and where they may bee beſt accommodated, and that you have ſpe­ciall regard to give as much eaſe as can be to ſuch as are wel-affected, and have borne moſt burthen in the former Leavies and Quar­terings.

A. Henderſon.

THeſe are to give power and Warrant to the Laird of Suinton, Laird of Arnot, and the Laird of Libberton, to ſee ſuch of the En­gliſh Forces as have had their Horſes plun­dered, or ſuffered any other wrong, repaired out of the Eſtates of thoſe who have been in the late Engagement, and have not ſubmit­ted to the Agreement. And to take ſpeciall care to keepe a good correſpondency betwixt5 this Committee and them, and betwixt them and the Country people where they are quar­tered.

A. Henderſon.

WHereas the Honorable Houſes of the Parliament of England, have bin plea­ſed to offer aſsiſtance to us for ſuppreſsing the common Enemy, Wee have thought fit that ſome Regiments of their Horſes doe ſtay in this kingdom for a ſhort time, And where­as divers abuſes hath been lately committed, and for preventing of which abuſes that may be done to any of the Souldiers under the Command of Major Gen. Lambert: We doe Command and Ordain the Committees of Warre, of the Shires where the ſaid Forces are now, or ſhall be hereafter Quartered, to take ſpeciall care that the Countrey people doe readily afford them the beſt Quarter and accommodation they can, during their ſtay, And we doe further declare, that whoſoever6 within this kingdome ſhall doe any wrongs or injuries in taking away their horſes or Armes, or ſhall offer violence to their per­ſons, that Order ſhall be given to the Troops that are kept up for the ſervice of the King­dome, that their whole moveable goods ſhall be confiſcated, and themſelves impriſoned or puniſhed with death, according as they ſhall deſerve, and if any of the Country people re­ceive wrong or injury from any of the En­gliſh Forces, they are to addreſſe themſelves and complain to this Committee, or Major Gen. Lambert, from whom they ſhall receive due ſatisfaction.

Ordains theſe preſents to bee publiſhed at the Market Croſſe of Edinburgh, Haddingtoune, Dunbar, Linlithgow, Peebles, that none pretend Ignorance.

THO. HENDERSON.
FINIS.

About this transcription

TextA bloody fight in Scotland within two miles of Edenburgh, since Lieut. Gen. Cromwel returned in to England. The malignants rize and fell upon Col. Gen. Lamberts men, but were repulsed and routed. Also instructions for the Lord Libberton, and Col. Innis, to treat with Col. Lambert. With a commission for divers lords to give satisfaction to the English and a proclamation published throught the kingdome of Scotland, for such, their goods to bee confiscate, and themselves punished with death. Octob. 15. 1648. Wee doe command and ordain these presents to bee published at the Market Crosse of Edenburgh, Haddington, Dunbarre, Lenilithgow, and Peebles, that none pretend ignorance. Tho. Henderson.
AuthorMargetts, Thomas..
Extent Approx. 9 KB of XML-encoded text transcribed from 5 1-bit group-IV TIFF page images.
Edition1648
SeriesEarly English books online.
Additional notes

(EEBO-TCP ; phase 2, no. A89526)

Transcribed from: (Early English Books Online ; image set 162351)

Images scanned from microfilm: (Thomason Tracts ; 75:E468[36])

About the source text

Bibliographic informationA bloody fight in Scotland within two miles of Edenburgh, since Lieut. Gen. Cromwel returned in to England. The malignants rize and fell upon Col. Gen. Lamberts men, but were repulsed and routed. Also instructions for the Lord Libberton, and Col. Innis, to treat with Col. Lambert. With a commission for divers lords to give satisfaction to the English and a proclamation published throught the kingdome of Scotland, for such, their goods to bee confiscate, and themselves punished with death. Octob. 15. 1648. Wee doe command and ordain these presents to bee published at the Market Crosse of Edenburgh, Haddington, Dunbarre, Lenilithgow, and Peebles, that none pretend ignorance. Tho. Henderson. Margetts, Thomas.. [2], 6 p. ... re-printed ... by Robert Ibbitson,London :1648.. (Reprint. Originally published: Edenburgh, first printed by Evan Tylar, printer to the Kings most Excellent Majesty.) (Consists of four parts. The first, the description of the fight in Scotland, dated and signed: Seatoun 18. Octob. 1648. Tho. Margetts. The second and third parts, dated October 10 and 13 respectively, "Instructions for the Laird of Libberton, and Collonel Innis." are both signed A. Henderson. The fourth, the Committee of Estates proclamation of cooperation with Major Gen. Lambert's forces in Scotland.) (Annotation on Thomason copy: "8ber [i.e. October] ye 24th".) (Reproduction of the original in the British Library.)
Languageeng
Classification
  • Lambert, John, 1619-1683 -- Early works to 1800.
  • Scotland -- Foreign relations -- England -- Early works to 1800.
  • Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Confiscations and contributions -- Early works to 1800.
  • Scotland -- History -- Charles I, 1625-1649 -- Early works to 1800.

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ImprintAnn Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) : 2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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  • STC Wing M591
  • STC Thomason E468_36
  • STC ESTC R205406
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